Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Memorial Day

Only one of my grandchildren accompanied me to decorate the cemeteries this year.  Kya is my buddy.  We visited both Woodmere where the Moses group is buried and also Spring Hill where the Hawkins group and ancestors of the Hawkins group are buried.

For my new found cousin, James Lewis, who is interested in the genealogy of the Hawkins family, I took a few extra photos of our mutual 3-gr-grandparent's graves:

Saturday, May 27, 2017

Hawkins Map of Kentucky

I did this map many years ago while working on sorting out all of the various Hawkins lines that moved from the Orange/Culpeper/Louisa county area of Virginia.  I am actually just putting it on the blog so that it is easy to find.  I have first put a smaller version in place.  With the larger version, you should be able to shift the map to zero in on various parts.  Many of these Hawkins families belong to Hawkins DNA family group #1.  Others seem to belong to other groups.  Some are still not placed in a DNA group in my own mind.  We all just chip away at figuring everyone out.

Friday, May 12, 2017

Goochland County

I am working on my Colonial Dames papers this weekend and thus I am looking at the Douglas Register  to use in proofs on generations from Louisa County, Virginia back to the Farrar family of Farrars Island.  The Douglas Register was transcribed and edited by W. Mac Jones in 1928.  At the time that he transcribed Rev William Douglas' records, he commented that the actual original book was in a good state of preservation.  His introduction says:

This book is known as the "Douglas Register" for the reason that it not only contains a record of Births, Chirstenings, Marriages, Deaths, and Funerals in St James Northam Parish and the county of Goochland, but in many instances in adjacent counties and others more remote.  The record also is not only for the period he was in charge of St James Northam Parish, but continues after he left that parish, on the 5th of September 1777, and went to live in Louisa County.  In fact he kept up the entries in the Register until 1797, and thus it covers a period of

 ninety-two years.

On the title page it says:  Being a detailed record of Births, Marriages, and Deaths together with other interesting notes, as kept by the Rev. William Douglas from 1750 to 1797.

And just below that it says:  An Index of Goochland Wills.  Notes on the French-Hugeunot Refugees who lived in Manakin-Town.

The reason that I am making notes in the blog while doing this project is that as I started reading, I decided I wanted some maps to help me interpret what I am reading.

And the above map suggests that these settlers came right up the James River just as those in Orange and Culpeper came up the Rappahannock and those in Louisa came up the North and South Anna rivers from the Pamunkey

I am viewing the Douglas Register on Ancestry.

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Very early settlement of New Jersey

My Moore group has been chatting about our Cureton ancestors.  James and Rose Moore's son John married Jane Cureton.  It is quite clear that Jane's family came over on the ship the Swan in 1685.  They settled in the Welsh Tract almost immediately.  However, we are not as certain how our Moore ancestors came to these shores.  We find James and Rose Moore in what is now downtown Philly by 1684....just two years after Penn had the city laid out.  Had they moved to these shores before and had been living elsewhere?  Did they move just in time to buy land in the new Philadelphia?  Our group is not sure.  We also are not sure just where they were living before they climbed on board a boat that brought them to our shores.